Foreword

The Royal Society of New Zealand is an independent and neutral statutory body incorporating the national academy of science and technology and a constituency of scientific and technological societies, regional societies, Fellows and individual Members. The Society includes the fundamental, applied and human dimensions of the biological, earth, engineering, information, mathematical, medical, physical, social and technological sciences. The Society has the statutory responsibility to foster a culture supportive of science and technology and it provides considered, expert advice on important public issues to the government and the community. The Society advances and promotes science and technology in New Zealand, recognises excellence in research, establishes ethical standards, encourages science and technology education, publishes scientific journals and education resources, and supports professional development through research grants and fellowships. Established in 1867 as The New Zealand Institute, the Society is incorporated under The Royal Society of New Zealand Act, 1997.

On 11 August 1997, The Royal Society of New Zealand Act, 1997, came into effect and Professor Sir John Scott was elected President of the Royal Society of New Zealand.

The Academy Council of the Royal Society of New Zealand is the independent science and technology academy of New Zealand dedicated to promoting excellence in science and technology.

This Yearbook is produced by the Academy Council and reports only on the activities of the Academy.

The mission of the Academy Council of the Royal Society of New Zealand is to recognise, support and encourage outstanding achievement and to foster excellence in the fields of science and technology, as well as to assist and support the activities of the Royal Society of New Zealand.

The strategy for implementing the Academy’s objectives is to:

  • recognise and encourage outstanding scientific and technological achievement;
  • encourage and stimulate high standards of scientific and technological endeavour;
  • reward excellence in the broad areas of science and technology covered by the Academy;
  • provide independent and non-partisan scientific and technological advice to the Society’s Council, government policy makers and the wider community.