CRESTlets

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  • NZIFST CREST Student Product Development Challenge: Congratulations to the 32 teachers and 102 students  who now have the opportunity to experience, first hand, the innovative work done by scientists, technologists and engineers in NZ’s food industry.

  • TechHub CREST Challenge. All the very best to the 135 Wellington students, their teachers and IITP mentors who have just started this inaugural challenge where they are required to develop a software program/application, following the principles of ICT development as used in the computer and software industry. 
  • Launch of the TechHub CREST Challenge (PDF, 411 kB): Great excitement at St Mary’s College ,Wellington.
  • WelTec Engineering CREST Challenge. It’s a wind up for the 44 Lower Hutt Y9/10 students, their teachers, and Futureintech mentors designing, building and testing a rubber band powered car! Many thanks to the Hutt city Council for their support of this challenge.
  • Student Research in the Manawatu: Great to see three proud CRESTers presenting their work to the Royal Society’s Manawatu Branch. Their CREST supervising teacher, Dr. Meikle, reported that the audience “….was impressed by the level of research, creative thinking and poised, articulate manner of the young scientists. The audience asked thoughtful questions which the students answered with ease. For me, it was wonderful to see the support they gave each other and for others a true sign that the future of science is in excellent hands…..”
  • Term one professional development e-newsletters now available: Secondary student achievement facilitators send regular e-newsletters to NZ secondary middle leaders. These newsletters include information about upcoming regional workshops and cluster sessions, guidelines for effective teaching and learning strategies, the latest information on standards alignment, links to resources and readings, and feedback from national moderators.
  • 2015 Teacher online PLD opportunities:  From CORE Education.
  • TRCC Courses: Current courses available to October ’15.
  • Visible Learning Summit: Auckland. March 27th. A one day professional development opportunity featuring a range of speakers and workshops. The goal of the Visible Learning Summit is to share stories and practice across a range of schools, providing unique insights on building better outcomes for learners.
  •  Plastic bioelectronics: 16 April, Auckland: Professor Jadranka Travas-Sejdic will present a public talk called ‘Plastic bioelectronics: From gene sensors spiced with nanodots to cell ticking’.

  • Teach First NZ Leadership Development Programme: Applications have opened for the Teach First NZ innovative 2-year Leadership Development Programme aimed at tackling educational inequality. Applications close 6 April.

  • Population census 2013 and its far-reaching implications: 7 April, Nelson: The Nelson Science Society presents  ‘Population census 2013 and its far-reaching implications?’ A Royal Society of New Zealand sponsored talk by Professor Gary Hawke FRSNZ and Dr Malcolm McKinnon.
  • The Science and Wonders of Light: A Year of Light special event for all ages! 11-17 April
  • Teachers of Agriculture and Horticulture:HATA Conference 2015 – Innovate and Invigorate, Christchurch, 12- 15 April
  • Outside the Box: the OTHER Learning areas. University of Waikato, Hamilton 12-15 April. A TRCC supported programme for primary and intermediate school teachers (Yr 0-8) to engage in professional learning associated with The Arts, Social Sciences, Science, Technology, and Health and Physical Education.
  • Science without Borders® Challenge: “Reef Relationships” is the theme for this yearly art competition that engages students to promote the need to preserve, protect, and restore the world’s oceans and aquatic resources. The international competition is open to all students 11-19 years old. To participate, challengers must submit an original piece of artwork by April 27, 2015.
  • Primary Science Week: 4-8 May. The theme is Light.
  • 2015 is the International Year of Light:  The New Zealand committee will be running many activities and events throughout the country. Check out the NZAPSE site!
  • TRLI funding round opens: The 2015 funding round for the Teaching and Learning Research Initiative (TLRI) opens on Monday 2 March. Expression of Interest (EOIs) are due by 7 May 2015. The fund is open to proposals from all sectors of education and training including early childhood, school, and the post school sector.
  • Google Science Fair:A global online science and technology competition open to individuals and teams from ages 13 to 18. Submissions deadline is 18 May. Worth considering entering a current, or about to be concluded,CREST project?
  • Love your rubbish:This LEARNZ virtual field trip is an opportunity for you and your class to follow a piece of rubbish from a lollipop to the landfill. 9-11 June.

  • BioLive/ChemEd 2015:Wellington 5-8 July. The focus for this joint conference will be Moving Forward: Pathways and Partnerships for Biology and Chemistry Learning. This year the Biology Educators’ Association of New Zealand (BEANZ) and The New Zealand Association of Science Educators (NZIC) will run their biennial conferences in tandem for the very first time.

  • Sir Paul Callaghan EUREKA! Awards – Workshops: To help students prepare their entries for the 2015 Sir Paul Callaghan EUREKA! Awards competitions will be held from 18 April until 9 May for Year 9-13 students and university undergraduates. The workshops, which will feature past winners and expert science communicators, have been specially designed for students who want to learn how to communicate their passion and vision for how science, technology, maths or engineering can provide solutions for the challenges facing New Zealand. The workshops will be held in Auckland, Hamilton, Palmerston North, Wellington, Christchurch and Dunedin . Regional competitions will be held in main centres in late July followed by the National Finals in Wellington on 3 September.  The closing date for entries is 19 June
  • Teachers of Physics:NZIP Conference: 6-8 July, The conference theme relates to International Year of Light.
  • Margaret Mahy Starlight Essay/Poetry Competition: New Zealand students (Yr 5-8 and Yr 9-13) can win an exciting weekend in Twizel, all expenses paid, a kitset Galileoscope and a visit to the University Observatory at Mt John. The Margaret Mahy Starlight poetry/essay competition is part of theStarlight Festival in Twizel from 9 – 11 October 2015. Prose or poetry can be imaginary, historical or scientifically based. Judges will be looking for knowledge of the southern stars and either good research or imaginative use of astronomy. Entries close 5pm 10 August
  • Spider and fern citizen science projects with Te Papa: Te Papa is running two citizen science projects alongside theDeCLASSIFIED! Nature’s secrets exposed at Te Papa  
  • Why does the Sun disappear? This activity demonstrates how a small object, which is near, can block out the view of a much larger one that is further away. 
  • Where are volcanos are erupting around the world right now?
  • Play the volcano game. You are the mayor of an island and have to keep everyone safe from the volcano eruption – good luck.
  • Devastating power of a super volcano :A TedEd talk.
  • Not all white light is the same: Make rainbows with CDs.

  • Peacock spider dance . Unique v ideo and link to Description of Darlington’s Peacock Spider (Araneae: Salticidae: Euophryinae: Maratus species A) from the Stirling Range National Park of Western Australia.

  • Space Weather: Predictions.

  • Sun as a Star: Ideas for activities.

  • Fancy Males: From peacocks to birds-of-paradise, many male birds have evolved extreme forms of fanciness. This website helpsthe viewer  explore some of the most impressive displays on the planet and learn about the evolutionary processes that drive these cases of excess.

  • The principle of parsimony-different ways of seeing colour: We often hear that the principle of parsimony supports simpler explanations over more complex ones—but it’s actually a little more complex than that. Scientists do prefer simpler explanations over more complex ones, but only if the two explanations account for the available evidence equally well. When parsimony and evidence support different explanations, evidence wins.

  • Power Struggle: Birds are doing a lot more than just feeding when they visit your bird feeder. They are coming and going and interacting with each other in a well-established social pecking order. At first it looks like just a flurry of activity—but watch closely and you’ll start to see the daily struggle of dominance playing out in your backyard. The slow-motion video above walks you through one example to show you what to look for.

  • Chameleon’s colour magic revealed: Humans have long been fascinated by chameleons changing colour to dazzle mates, scare rivals and confuse predators, now scientists have uncovered the mechanism behind the feat.

  • Five more mysteries for the Large Hadron Collider to solve: The Higgs boson was so 2012! From WIMPS to killer strangelets – with extra power the collider could open up more unexplored realms of particle science.

  • Science of war..Spotting enemy guns using toilet-inspired technology: A WW 1 “ Eureka” moment…. 

  • New centre for science engagement at the Otago Museum:This  will include the installation of a digital immersive planetarium, the redevelopment of the popular Discovery World, the renovation of the educational suites and the creation of a dedicated science communication team to staff the centre.

  • How big is infinity? Is it the biggest thing we can think of?

  • Science Alive: This is the perfect time to plan activities and programmes for the end of Term 1 and beginning of Term 2.

  • TechLink: Techlink is a site dedicated to Technology teachers, students and all those with an interest in technology education in New Zealand. Techlink showcases examples of contemporary teaching and learning in Technology from early childhood through to vocational pathways into industry and enterprise.Techlink hosts t-news, a major information source for teachers across all Technology subject areas, serving the needs of the four TESAC associations: TENZ, NZGTTA, NZACDITT and HETTANZ.

  • Take this: This collection of  Maths resources is based on the idea that you can ‘take something’ and use it as a context to capture the interest of students. Each Take This is a single page of springboard ideas designed to flexibly connect mathematics across the strands.

  • Level 4 Rich Learning Activities:These Level 4 learning activities are a collection of tasks with engaging contexts which include annotated student work to illustrate a range of approaches.

  • How To Prove A Geometric Formula With A Clementine And A Piece of Paper:  Tangible proof that the surface area of a sphere is 4πr2!

  • Custom web design keeps spiders in business: Spiders can customise their webs to make sure they get the diet they need, new research suggests.

  • Six ways the blue and black dress scrambles your brain: It’s a very rare event when visual neuroscience and textile technology combine to take over the interwebs, but it almost happened in February, 2015.

  • Reasoning: Reasoning is fundamental to knowing and doing mathematics but when do we reason, what does reasoning ‘look like’ and how can we help children get better at it?

  • Space Probes: Where  in the solar system are they? Find out on this handy website.

  • Greening chemistry :Chemistry is not always completely environmentally friendly; green chemistry is working to change that.

  • Mercury shines in blue and gold: NASA’s Messenger spacecraft has given scientists their best view ever of Mercury, the nearest planet to the Sun.

  • All about averages: How well do you really understand mean, median and mode?In these puzzling problems discover how averages change when data sets are tweaked.

  • What’s  the difference between a butterfly and a moth?

  • Beautiful Moths: A moth is an insect closely related to the butterfly, both being of the order Lepidoptera. Moths form the majority of this order. There are thought to be 150,000 to 250,000 different species of moth (about ten times the number of species of butterfly), with thousands of species yet to be described. Most species of moth are nocturnal, but there are crepuscular and diurnal species

  • Play the pepper moth simulation game. What makes a moth easy to spot? 

  • A smelter on a stick: Smelting iron ore to iron on a gas burner. This ELI gives a simple introduction to the smelting of metal ores by reducing them to the metal with charcoal. This linking of a small-scale activity to the real world of the blast furnace requires bridging skills.

  • Watery world game: investigating the water cycle(for younger students, this ELI  game can be played in any science or geography lesson and has cross curricular links with literacy and numeracy. It is also a useful water cycle introduction or revision exercise.

  • Ideal lash length follows one-third rule: Long lashes may make your eyes stand out, but researchers have discovered the ideal lash length that protects your eyes from dust and damage.

  • Wear your team’s colours with pride – on your teeth: Fancy decorating your mouth in the colours of your favourite Cricket World Cup team?

  • The perfect meal: Psychology is teaching us how to make food sweeter without changing its ingredients.

  • Look, something shiny! How color images can influence consumers.

  • Move over Mozart: Study shows cats prefer their own beat.

  • Isostasy: Essentially the principle of hydrostatic equilibrium applied to the Earth, otherwise called ‘buoyancy’. You can model this principle using wooden blocks floating in water and in a denser medium.