CRESTlets

This page contains links to external websites. Although we make every effort to ensure these links are accurate, up to date and relevant, the Royal Society of New Zealand cannot take responsibility for pages maintained by external providers

 

HeadsUp special: Safety Ethics Science Fairs  (PDF, 455 kB)

  (PDF, 455 kB)

  • New Zealand’s Next Top Engineering Scientist: This fun and challenging day long competition is for teams of three to four senior students, who have interests in mathematics and science. The 2015 competition will run near the start of term 3, on Saturday the 1st of August. The problem is revealed at 9am in the morning and students work in their teams to provide a solution by 6pm of that day.  First prize is $6,000 plus there are two runner-up prizes of $2,000. For more information and to register your team(s) on the website . Registrations close Friday 24th of July
  • Te Wiki o te Reo Māori /Māori Language Week 27 July–2 August: The kaupapa for Te Wiki o te Reo Māori 2015 is ‘Whāngaihia te reo Māori ki ngā mātua.’ We aim to encourage and support the language development of parents who can then whāngai the language to their children. Te Wiki o te Reo Māori /Māori Language Week takes place this year between Monday 27 July and Sunday 2 August. The  NZ Curriculum Online resource page offers ideas, links, and stories to help schools engage with their parents, families, and whānau to support the learning of te reo Māori in both the school and home environment.
  • The Prime Minister’s Science Teacher Prize:Nominations for this Prize open on 1 May 2015, and close at 5pm (NZST), Friday 31 July, This Prize will be given in recognition of an outstanding teacher of Science. The Prime Minister’s Science Teacher Prize is worth $150,000 with the recipient receiving $50,000 and the recipient’s school receiving $100,000.
  • New Zealand International Biology Olympiad (NZIBO): The New Zealand team to compete in Denmark in July is: Zhong Huang from Macleans College; Cherie Jia, Auckland International College; Nikita Lyons, Waikato Diocesan School; and Ery Zhu from Avondale College. Students keen to participate in the 2016 NZIBO programme and potentially trial for the 2016 team to go to Vietnam, should register via the website. Registrations close 7 August.
  • Margaret Mahy Starlight Essay/Poetry Competition: New Zealand students (Y 5-8 and Y 9-13) can win an exciting weekend in Twizel, all expenses paid, a kit-set Galileoscope and a visit to the University Observatory at Mt John. The Margaret Mahy Starlight poetry/essay competition is part of the Starlight Festival in Twizel from 9 – 11 October 2015. Prose or poetry can be imaginary, historical or scientifically based. Judges will be looking for knowledge of the southern stars and either good research or imaginative use of astronomy. Entries close 5pm 10 August.
  • Going Super Heavy(2015 Rutherford Lectures): Distinguished professor Peter Schwerdtfeger about  going super heavy – the end of the periodic table of elements. Go to the website to register.  Hamilton 11 August, Palmerston North 13 August, Wellington 18 August, Christchurch 26 August, Dunedin 27 August, Auckland 7 October
  • Bird Evolution – From Dinosaurs To DNA : Scott Edwards, Professor of Zoology and Curator of Ornithology, Harvard University, is the next Allan Wilson Centre visiting speaker. Book now for  free public talks  in  Wellington 11 August; Napier 12 August, Christchurch 13 August, Nelson, 14 August; Dunedin 17 Au and , 19 August; Auckland
  • Smart Motorways – technologies making roads safer and more sustainable: A new LEARNZ field trip for Social Sciences and Technology. This field trip will run from 25-27 August and is supported by NZTA. This trip fits well with big ideas like national identity, transport, teamwork, community, citizenship, economic development and sustainability. We’d love to get your students involved with this nationally significant project, New Zealand’s first smart motorway.
  • 2016 MESNZ Engineering Scholarship: As part of the Maintenance Engineering Society of New Zealand’s objective to encourage New Zealand students into tertiary education in the field of engineering technology, a MESNZ Engineering Scholarship worth up to $5,000 is being offered for the specific purpose of covering tuition fees in 2016. Applications close on 31 August 2015
  • 2016 Teacher Study Awards: Teach NZ offers Teacher Study Awards and other professional development opportunities. The awards allow educators to complete a qualification, take time off each week to study while teaching, move to another curriculum or subject area, or take time off to research a topic of interest. They also offer other professional development opportunities.. Applications for the next  “Award of Interest”  are due 7th September.
  • LEARNZ- Kea : New Zealand’s  threatened mountain parrot.  8 September
  • The Someday Challenge: The challenge is to make a short film about sustainability. Entries close 11  September
  • WorleyParsons is providing three Professional Engineering Scholarships to  Y13 students about to begin an Engineering degree at a University in New Zealand. The Scholarships are designed to assist the young people of Taranaki, Hawke’s Bay and Northland to further their ambitions and opportunities toward a career as a Professional Engineer. The Scholarships will have a value of $5,000 each, which will be paid in four annual instalments of $1,250. Students may be given the opportunity to undertake part of their required professional work experience for their degree at WorleyParsons after completion of their 3rd year of University study. Each recipient will also be appointed a Graduate Engineer as a mentor from WorleyParsons Graduate Development Organisation (GDO) who will maintain a relationship with the recipient throughout their time at University. Applications close on the 25th of September.

  • TENZ Conference 2015:4-7 October, Hamilton.
  • Powering Potential: This exciting national event will be launching in December 2015 for forty successful and passionate science students who are in Year 12 and Year 13. Powering Potential will not only challenge students but will also enhance their problem solving, team building and collaboration skills.  They will get to meet and make friends with lots of other like-minded students from all over New Zealand.  They will also network and talk with scientists who have had to solve their own problems.Powering Potential will be inspiring, fun, challenging and empowering. Students that are selected will learn lots about themselves and will be encouraged and mentored to think outside the square so that they will be motivated, divergent thinkers in the future. Powering Potential will take place in Wellington from 13 – 16 December 2015. All nomination/application material must be received by 4pm on 6 October 2015.
  • ULearn 2015 Permission to Play:7–9 October, Auckland
  • 2015 Teacher online PLD opportunities:  From CORE Education.
  • TRCC Courses: Current courses available to October ’15
  • House of Science Symposium: 06 Nov, 2015.The House of Science Tauranga is offering a day of networking to the local science community – with Siouxie Wiles as the keynote speaker.There will be something for teachers (primary and secondary), tertiary students, researchers, scientists and local science industry representatives. Registration includes morning tea, lunch and a free drink at the end of the day.
  • ‘Space survival: How could we survive a year in a dome? Pupils plan to survive for a year in a sealed dome in a desert’. Understanding the water and carbon cycles.
  •  Mini-world water cycle; a water cycle demonstration model in a box’?
  • Music a universal language? While music is often touted as the “universal language of mankind” it turns out that isn’t quite true. An analysis of more than 300 music recordings from across the globe shows there is in fact no “absolute” commonality that binds all styles of music together.
  • Gene tweak turned gastro bug into Black Death killer: The bacterium Yersinia pestis has inflicted almost unimaginable misery upon humankind over the centuries, killing an estimated 200 million or more people and triggering horrific plagues in the 6th and 14th centuries.
  • Alien planet in comet’s clothing: Astronomers discover a planet that looks like a comet. Also; how magnetic fields could help to form a galaxy’s spectacular spiral arms, and Earth hit by two geomagnetic storms in a week.
  • Infrared lifts the veil on a golden city: This beautiful golden jewel of tightly packed stars near the centre of our galaxy is normally hidden by dust.
  • Aurora spectacle captured from the space station: This image, taken from the International Space Station, captures the stunning glow of an aurora over planet Earth earlier this week.
  • The sound of one ear ringing:  Right now your ears are probably ringing with a sound that’s as unique as your fingerprint. And it’s not tinnitus.
  • Otherworldly magic created by a carnivorous fungus gnat: Captivating long-exposure photos of NZ glowworms.
  • How quick is your arithmetic? This quiz will test your skills!
  • Ethnomathematics:The term ethnomathematics was first used in the late 1960s by a Brazilian mathematician, Ubiratan D’Ambrosio, to describe the mathematical practices of identifiable cultural groups. Some see it as the study of mathematics in different cultures, others as a way of making mathematics more relevant to different cultural or ethnic groups, yet others as a way of understanding the differences between cultures.
  • NZ Maths-rich learning activities:NZ Maths now has rich learning activities at levels 3, 4, and 5. The activities are designed to provide engaging contexts and an opportunity to apply the maths learned in previous lessons. They can be accessed through the Teaching Material section of nzmaths.
  • Changes to the Technology Online website: These changes relate to the Teacher Education, the Indicators of progression and the Specialist areas of technology sections of the site. These changes include removing outdated materials and connecting the indicators of progression diagrams to the curriculum diagram and to specific related resources by both component and by strand. The indicators and progression diagrams are also now available in Word format enabling them to be copied and pasted as required.The six introductory modules have been relocated from the Technology in the NZC to the Teacher Education section. The Key Messages (NCEA) section has been deleted. This material is now located in the Technology Curriculum Guide (Teaching and Learning Guide) in the Achievement and learning objectives section.The two Publications sections have been renamed Readings for researchers and Archived papers to more accurately reflect their content and are housed in the Teacher Education section.
  •  Wimbledon Sports Data for the Math Classroom: Using sports data in the math classroom is a great way to hook students with real world numbers. Whether you are creating word problems or graphing data, there is so much information available related to sports.  This iPad App  is full of data that can be incorporated into classroom instruction.  Students and teachers can access live scores as well as past results.Depending on the task that you’ve developed for students, you can use this data to meet the expectations of your curriculum and program.  For example, Create a multiplication word problem using three numbers you located in one player’s profile or Find the difference between two players average scores for their first two matches.

  •  ‘Tag’ a carbon atom – and explore the carbon cycle; a thought experiment to investigate carbon cycle processes.: This  ELI activity asks pupils to ‘visualise’ stages of the carbon cycle by ‘following’ a ‘tagged’ carbon atom. Visualising the movement of a carbon atom through various elements of the carbon cycle involves creativity and imagination as well as the use of bridging skills to apply the carbon cycle diagram to reality.

  • Plants react to the sound of being eaten alive: Plants don’t just feel themselves being eaten, they fight back.

  • Science Vs E cigarettes: Electronic Cigarettes have been hailed by some as a breakthrough in the battle to help people quit smoking, while others say these devices are creating a new generation of nicotine addicts. So, what does the science say?

  • Signs of ageing appear in mid-20s: Fine lines are the least of your worries when you’re in your mid-20s, your body may be already starting to show signs of ageing in many other ways by that time, a new study shows.

  • Ancient fish evolved gills to survive acidic oceans: Fish gills evolved to balance pH, not breathe, suggests a new study.

  • Genome reveals how woolly mammoth thrived in the cold: An exhaustive genetic analysis of woolly mammoths and their living cousins, Asian and African elephants, has revealed a slew of genetic adaptations that enabled the Ice Age giants to survive adverse conditions.

  • Neurones involved in everyday memories identified: Scientists have identified individual neurones involved in the formation of memories of everyday events.

  • Infectious cancers: Is it possible to pass cancer from one individual to another? For some animals, it is – and, sadly, a unique Tasmanian species is facing possible extinction as a result.

  • Colour to dye for:The basic chemistry of hair dyes has changed little over the past century, but what do we know about the risks of colouring our hair, and why do we do it?

  • Ebola in numbers: using mathematics to tackle epidemics :Discovering how infectious diseases spread may seem purely a matter for medical science – but taking a close look at the numbers can also tell us a great deal.

  • Molecule of the Month:Each month since then a new molecule has been added to the list on this page. The links will take you to a page at one of the Web sites at a University Chemistry Department or commercial site  anywhere in the world, where useful (and hopefully entertaining!), information can be found about a particularly interesting molecule.

  • Cobalt is named for the German word “kobold,” or goblin. The association wasn’t innocent. It got the name because cobalt was responsible for the horrible and mysterious deaths of miners.

  • X-Rays: Originally discovered by accident, X-rays are now used about 100 million times a year in clinics around the world. How do these magic eyes work? This TEDEd outlines the history and mechanics of the X-ray machine and CT scanners.

  • Once upon a time there was a pterodactyl :Adapting the steps of the scientific method can help students write about science in a vivid and creative way. 

  • Investigating blood types: In this experiment, simple liquids that mimic blood are used to demonstrate blood typing.

  • A screaming roller coaster: How fast am I travelling (due to Earth’s spin and Earth’s orbit)?
  • The magic sand mystery: Using an everyday toy can introduce mystery into the classroom and help explain chemistry.

  • Beat the Flood: Imagine living with the danger that your home could be flooded at any time.

  • Mount Raung: After several weeks of tectonic rumblings beneath the surface, one of the most active volcanoes in Indonesia began spewing ash plumes and lava into the skies over tropical Asia. At least 900 airplane flights into and out of Bali and other regional airports were cancelled due to concerns about the ash clouds, which wafted as high as 6 kilometers into the air. On July 12, 2015, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Aqua satellite captured a natural-colour view (top) of a plume of ash and volcanic gases trailing away from the mountain. The image has a resolution of roughly 250 meters per pixel.

  • The pentaquark: Scientists at the Large Hadron Collider have announced the discovery of a new kind of particle called the pentaquark, solving a 50-year-old puzzle about the building blocks of matter.

  • The sound of Lattes: Lattes sound different from macchiatos, and Vienna’s sing the scale! There’s more to coffee than latte-art — every time you froth some milk or stir in cream, there’s a bit of physics going on.

  • A psychedelic X-ray of our Sun: A composite X-ray image taken by three different space telescopes.

  • A World Without:Food Science

  • Make Science Fun: Every Saturday  Science Alive  will be sharing an educator specific idea or tip for teaching children and teenagers about Science and Technology.

  • Animal Research: NCEA Resources for Schools: The Australian and New Zealand Council for the Care of Animals in Research and Teaching has supported the development of four NCEA assessment tasks that have received the Quality Assured Assessment materials trade mark (QAAM) from the NZQA for NCEA Achievement Standards (Biology 1.2, 2.2, and 3.2), which integrates biological knowledge to develop an informed response to a socio-scientific issue. The four resources are:

    • Animal research: What’s a life worth? – NCEA Level 1 – Internal Assessment Resource (Biology 1.2 – Report on a biological issue)
    • Animal research: The best thing for human medicine and animals? – NCEA Level 2 – Internal Assessment Resource (Biology 2.2 – Analyse the biological validity of information presented to the public)
    • Animal research: The ethics of using animals for research and teaching in New Zealand – NCEA Level 3 – Internal Assessment Resource (Biology 3.2 – Integrate biological knowledge to develop an informed response to a socio-scientific issue)
    • Animal research: Predator proof fences – NCEA Level 3 – Internal Assessment Resource (Biology 3.2 – Integrate biological knowledge to develop an informed response to a socio-scientific issue)

    These teaching resources are not available on-line, but can be sent to teachers upon request (contact anzccart@royalsociety.org.nz )

  • New Horizons: Pluto